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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of the mineral Cylindrite is indicated by FePb3Sn4Sb2S14 or Iron Lead Tin Antimony Sulfide. Cylindrite is actually a Sulfide mineral. The name Cylindrite is derived from the Greek word kylindros, which means a cylinder. This is relative to its unique crystal habit that is in form of tubes or cylinders. Mineral Cylindrite was first discovered from the Santa Cruz Mine in Poopo town, Oruro Department in Bolivia. The year of discovery is 1893. Cylindrite mineral is known to crystallize in the trigonal crystal system but this issue is in dispute. Mineral Cylindrite is commonly used as a mineral specimen and it is often found exhibiting nice and splendid microscope images when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Cylindrite is also considered as a minor ore of lead and tin. And as an ore mineral, it most commonly displays a majestic microscope image when evaluated with the aid of an ore polarizing light microscope.

Most mineralogists consider Cylindrite as the most unusual sulfide mineral that exhibits a very interesting microscope image under polarized light microscope. When this sulfide mineral Cylindrite is evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope, it can be seen exhibiting a wonderful and unique crystal habit, which corners and catches the attention in the mineral market. The crystals of this mineral Cylindrite are most splendidly found as coiled sheets rolled up to appear like tubes or cylinders. When exposed to high pressure, this crystal sheets are often found uncoiled and are usually called leaves or shells that also exhibits a very interesting microscope image under polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. This type of crystal habit can be only found visible at a microscopic level and often found occurring with serpentine and chlorite. The resulting crystals are actually tiny tubes that are almost hair like when viewed with the aid of polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Some Cylindrite mineral tube crystals are visible to the naked eye. But in order to see the fine details of the specimen, a hand lens or a loop must be used. But when the mineral is evaluated with the aid of the petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy, a clear picture of the mineral can be seen and the finest feature can be set clearly visible by using higher magnifications. Mineral Cylindrite is most commonly sought after by those collectors who like one-of-a-kind mineral specimens because of its unusual and fascinating crystal habit that is commonly majestically exhibited when viewed with the aid of polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists.

Cylindrite mineral crystals are most commonly found exhibiting an iron black to gray color that could appear more interesting when viewed under polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Cylindrite commonly exhibits a metallic luster when it is evaluated in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Cylindrite mineral has no cleavage planes found visible even if it is evaluated under several minor adjustments made on the aperture diaphragm of the polarized microscopes for mineralogists. Cylindrite is also commonly found showing conchoidal to uneven fracture that could be seen more clearly visible when specimen is evaluated with the aid of geological polarizing microscopes. The specific gravity measure of the mineral is commonly found ranging from 5.4 grams per cubic centimeters to 5.5 grams per cubic centimeters, which are considered somewhat heavier than average for metallic minerals. The hardness measure of mineral Cylindrite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is commonly 2.5. Cylindrite mineral crystals are actually malleable. Cylindrite is most commonly found leaving a black streak when specimens are rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate.

Crystals of Cylindrite mineral are commonly found opaque in appearance. The crystal habit of Cylindrite as described in optical mineralogy commonly includes the extremely unique cylindrical tubes that are most clearly visible when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Cylindrite mineral crystals are most commonly found as small wrapped cylinders that appear like rolls or tubes made of metallic cloth and are most often splendidly exhibited under polarizing microscopes. Cylindrite crystals can be also found in massive forms. If exposed under pressure, the cylindrical formation of the crystals will separate to form shells or leaves that are usually fascinatingly beautiful when evaluated under polarized light microscopes for mineralogists.

Cylindrite are commonly found anisotropic when it is closely evaluated between crossed nicols of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. This means that it appears alternately dark and illuminated when viewed at several stage rotations and angles views between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing microscope for mineralogists. Cylindrite actually exhibits a distinct anisotropism. Cylindrite crystals are most commonly found exhibiting a gray white color when they are evaluated in reflected light of polarized light microscope. Cylindrite mineral is weakly pleochroic and this can be seen clearly displayed under petrographic polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for this mineral Cylindrite. However, the specimens of this mineral species should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them.

Mineral Cylindrite are commonly associated with several other interesting minerals like cassiterite, pyrite, franckeite, sphalerite and teallite. The best field indicators of this sulfide mineral Cylindrite usually include it very unusual crystal habit, softness, luster, color as well as its locality. Mineral Cylindrite is most commonly found in tin deposits and ores. Mineral Cylindrite has limited occurrence at famous mineral locality in Mina Santa Cruz, Poopo, Oruro in Bolivia and also at some few other tin sulfide deposits.



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Wednesday, January 14th, 2009 at 7:47 am
Category:
The Sulfides Mineral Class
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