Leave a message
Mon
29
Sep

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of the mineral Cinnabar is indicated by HgS or Mercury Sulfide. Cinnabar is actually a Sulfide mineral. The name Cinnabar is derived from the Middle English word cinnabar, also from a Latin word cinnabars, and from the Greek word cinnabar. It can be noticed that Cinnabar has of uncertain original meaning. Cinnabar was mined for its mercury content by the Roman Empire. And it has been considered as the main ore of mercury all throughout the centuries. In fact, those mining areas, which are mined by the Romans long time ago, are still being mined today as Cinnabar source of locality. It has been found that Cinnabar and quartz minerals are sharing the same type of symmetry but they however differ in their crystal habit formations. Cinnabar mineral is known to crystallize in the hexagonal crystal system. In optical mineralogy, the hexagonal system of crystallization comprises crystals having four axes. Three of which are positioned in a single plane with equal length and are symmetrically spaced. The fourth axis is found to be perpendicular to the other three axes.

 

            Cinnabar is most commonly found in shades of bright scarlet or cinnamon red to brick red and it is more fascinating and interesting to view under petrographic polarizing light microscope. Cinnabar is most commonly found exhibiting adamantine luster and sometimes may appear submetallic in darker specimens when viewed in reflected light of petrographic polarizing light microscope. Cinnabar is also commonly found exhibiting a perfect cleavage in three directions that are usually found forming prisms when it is closely evaluated between crossed nicols of polarizing light microscope. The fracture that is commonly found exhibited by the mineral Cinnabar when it is closely evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarized light microscope is usually uneven to splintery. The specific gravity measure of Cinnabar mineral specimens are usually found giving an approximate value of 8.1+ grams per cubic centimeters, which is considered very heavy for a non-metallic mineral. The hardness measure of mineral Cinnabar when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is commonly found ranging from 2 to 2.5. Cinnabar is most commonly found leaving a red streak when it is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate.

 

            The crystals of Cinnabar are commonly found translucent to transparent in appearance. The crystal habit of Cinnabar as described in the field of optical mineralogy commonly includes well-formed and large crystals, which are considerably scarce and are commonly exhibiting a nice and splendid microscope image under polarized light microscopes. Cinnabar crystals are more commonly found in crusts formations and the crystal complexes are also common. Cinnabar crystals can be also found disseminated, which occurs in small and distinct particles that are dispersed in matrix and are usually exhibiting a nice and interesting microscope image under polarized microscopes. Cinnabar minerals may also be found in massive forms or maybe in capillary needles, which are commonly displaying nice and wonderful microscope images under petrographic polarizing light microscope. They can be also found in druse form, which are also forming the crystal growth in a cavity that results in numerous crystal tipped surfaces. Cinnabar crystals that are found usually tend to appear like six sided trigonal scalahedrons, which also appear to have opposing three sided pyramids. Cinnabar crystals, as mentioned, are commonly twinned and they are usually forming modified prismatic rhombohedrons.

 

            Cinnabar is most commonly found exhibiting a very high surface relief when it is closely evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Mineral Cinnabar is a uniaxial positive figure and it can be seen clearly visible under a polarizing light microscope. Cinnabar minerals are also considered slightly sectile and the crystals can be also found striated as described in optical mineralogy. The maximum birefringence is of Cinnabar mineral is found as 0.351. These can be seen clearly visible under polarized light microscope for mineralogists. In the field of optical mineralogy, Cinnabar is described as a non fluorescent mineral. It is a dichroic mineral showing a cochineal red. It also shows high anisotrophism when viewed between crossed nicols of polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Cinnabar is also known as a not radioactive mineral. This has been justified under several chemical analysis made. Hand washing is advised after handling Cinnabar mineral specimens. This is highly recommended because of the high mercury content of the mineral. Avoid inhaling the dust upon handling or breaking the material. Cinnabar has very high refractive power.

 

            Cinnabar mineral crystals are commonly associated with other interesting and attractive minerals such as pyrite, quartz, realgar, dolomite, mercury and stibnite. Cinnabar minerals are actually deposited from the hydrothermal solution veins. They are also found as impregnations near recent volcanic rocks and hot springs. Cinnabar minerals are actually formed in low temperature hydrothermal solutions in veins. The best field indicators of mineral Cinnabar usually include density, cleavage, softness, crystal habit and its wonderful color, which can be majestically exhibited under polarizing light microscope. Cinnabar minerals can be notably found at some localities including Almaden in Spain, some areas in Unites States such as California, Arkansas, Texas and Oregon. They can be also found at Hunan Province in China and also in Idria, Siberia.



Author:
Time:
Monday, September 29th, 2008 at 2:44 am
Category:
The Sulfides Mineral Class
RSS:
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
Navigation:
Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope