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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

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The chemical formula of mineral Acanthite is indicated by (Ag)2S, a Silver Sulfide. Acanthite is actually a Sulfide mineral. The name origin of the mineral Acanthite has close relation to that of the mineral Argentite. From a Latin word Argentum that means silver, the name Argentite was derived. It is also the origin of the symbol Ag for the element silver. The name Acanthite originated from a Greek word Acantha, which means thorn. This is actually relative to the splendid crystal habit of mineral Acanthite that can be seen majestically exhibited under polarized light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Acanthite is considered as one of the most important silver ore mineral. And as an ore mineral of silver, it is often found exhibiting a nice and fascinating microscope appearance when viewed with the aid of an ore polarizing light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy.

 

            Acanthite crystals are very rare in formation and occurrence. They appear to include well-formed pseudo cubes, octahedrons, and dodecahedrons, which can be clearly visible when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Their formation is identified as massive long prismatic crystals that are most often found splendidly exhibited under polarizing microscope for mineralogists.

 

            They are considered argentite crystals at temperature above 173 degree Celsius. They show isometric formation as viewed upon polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy field of study. At temperature below 173 degree Celsius, they show monoclinic formation, which also include pseudoorthorhombic forms when examined under polarized light microscope for mineralogists.  They also tend to show slender prismatic habit and several other fascinating crystal habits can be seen clearly visible when the mineral Acanthite is evaluated with the aid of polarizing microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy. Aborescent or the treelike growths of branches are shown and majestically exhibited under petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The blocky system where crystal shape tends to appear equant, and the skeletal formation where crystal form crude outlines with missing forces are quite easily identified if the mineral species is examined with the use of petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy.

 

            The hardness measure of mineral Acanthite using the Mohs scale method is usually ranging from 2 to 3 and is considered soft at an average of 2.5. It is known display metallic appearance and obviously exhibits metallic luster when viewed in reflected light of polarizing microscope for mineralogists. Mineral Acanthite is found having conchoidal fracture when it is evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarized light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. More often, it shows uneven fracture and somewhat sectile in appearance. In the field of optical mineralogy, sectile means it can be easily cut or scrape by a knife. It is also showing shiny black streak when rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. Specific gravity measure of the mineral usually gives an approximate value that ranges form 5.5 grams per cubic centimeters to 5.8 grams per cubic centimeters and is slightly heavy at an average of 5.6 grams per cubic centimeters even for metallic minerals. Under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarizing microscope, the cleavage appears to be indistinct and most commonly considered absent when examined with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope. Fresh Acanthite mineral crystal appears to be brilliant and lustrous when viewed under polarized microscopes and eventually tarnishes to a relatively dull black color when exposed to light. It may also show lead gray color to black metallic color when viewed in reflected light of polarizing microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy.

 

            With the use of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy, mineral Acanthite shows a very weak or slow change in color as the stage is rotated in varying degrees in plane-polarized light. It commonly shows no change in color or no other color bands found even viewed with crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing microscope for mineralogists. The mineral Acanthite is known to be sectile. The implication is that, it can be cut easily using a knife just like lead. These Acanthite minerals commonly occur in low temperature hydrothermal veins. Some others can be found in secondary enrichment zones. Mostly, they are notably reported to exist in hydrothermal replacements deposits. Since these minerals form rare crystals, only few specimens exist.    



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Saturday, November 28th, 2009 at 10:12 am
Category:
The Sulfides Mineral Class
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