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The chemical formula of mineral Thenardite is indicated by Na2SO4 or Sodium Sulfate. Thenardite is actually a Sulfate mineral. It is commonly considered as a source of sodium to produce soda. It has various uses in the glass and paper industries. It is also most commonly used as mineral specimen and is often found showing nice and interesting microscope images when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Thenardite is actually one of the several non-marine evaporite Sulfate Class minerals. Thenardite should be stored with a desiccant because it easily dissolves in water. Thenardite was named after Louis J. Thenard, a French chemist. Thenardite has salty taste just like halite. Thenardite is generally found fluorescent showing white color in shortwave ultraviolet light and a yellow-green color in the longwave ultraviolet light.

 

            Thenardite is usually forming diamond-like shaped crystals that can be found more splendidly exhibited when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Thenardite crystals are generally flattened and are sometimes well-formed showing good orthorhombic symmetry. It is important to note that Thenardite is a radioactive mineral. It should therefore be stored in closed containers because they are metastable. Thenardite specimens gradually absorb water and converts to mineral mirabilite. Thenardite are secondary mineral forming the speleothems of the Mt. Etna Cave in Italy.

             Thenardite is typically found gray, white, colorless or brownish white or yellowish white in color when viewed with the aid of polarized microscopes for mineralogists. Thenardite is also usually found showing vitreous, pearly to resinous luster when viewed in reflected light of polarizing microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy. Most crystals of mineral Thenardite are transparent to translucent in appearance. Thenardite is known to crystallize in the orthorhombic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this orthorhombic crystal system comprises crystals having three mutually perpendicular axes, of which all are of different lengths. The crystal habit of mineral Thenardite as described in the field of optical mineralogy usually include tabular, dipyramidal, flattened, diamond-shaped crystals that are often intergrown. It is also found forming arrowhead like crystals and crossed interpenetration twins that can be noticed more clearly visible when  specimen is viewed under polarizing microscope used in optical mineral. Thenardite is also found in crust, granular and massive rock forming beds.              Thenardite is also found showing perfect pinacoidal cleavage found in one direction when specimen is evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Thenardite is also found showing uneven to hackly or splintery fracture when viewed under polarized microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The hardness measure of the mineral Thenardite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually 2.5 to 3. Thenardite is most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimen sample is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of the mineral is approximately 2.7 grams per cubic centimeters, which is average for translucent minerals, which is average for translucent minerals. Thenardite is found to be easily soluble in water. It has also salty taste. It is also a fluorescent mineral. Thenardite is most commonly found associated with other minerals including halite, trona, alunite, borax and other borate minerals. The best field indicators of mineral Thenardite usually include environment of formation, taste, crystal habit, cleavage, fluorescence and associations. Thenardite notably occurs at several localities including several California sites, some areas in USA, Spain, Italy, Russia, Chile, Kazakhstan and Canada. 



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Thursday, August 13th, 2009 at 2:21 pm
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The Sulfates Mineral Class
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