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The chemical formula of mineral Linarite is indicated by PbCuSO4(OH)2 or Lead Copper Sulfate Hydroxide. Linarite is actually a Sulfate mineral. Linarite was first discovered at Linares, Jaen in Andalusia, Spain. The mineral was first described in 1822 from this locality. The name Linarite was given to the species in 1839. The mineral was actually name dafter its type of locality at Linares, Jaen, Spain. Linarite is known to crystallize in the monoclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, the monoclinic system of crystal formation comprises crystals having three axes of unequal lengths. Two of which are usually found in a position that is oblique or not perpendicular to one another. However, both of which are commonly found perpendicular to the third axis. Linarite is commonly used as mineral specimen and it is often found exhibiting nice and splendid appearance when viewed under petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Linarite is commonly found showing bright azure blue color that can be more splendidly exhibited under petrographic polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Mineral Linarite is a very beautiful yet considerably rare mineral species that usually displays majestic images when viewed under polarizing microscopes.

 

            Mineral Linarite is usually found exhibiting bright azure blue color that is more impressing when viewed under polarized light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Linarite is most commonly found exhibiting a vitreous to adamantine to earthy luster in massive specimens when evaluated in reflected light of geological polarizing microscope. Mineral Linarite is also found showing perfect cleavage in one direction and distinct in the other direction, and this can be noticed more clearly when the mineral is evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Linarite also shows conchoidal fracture when viewed under polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. The specific gravity measure of mineral Linarite usually gives an approximate value of about 5.3+ grams per cubic centimeters, which is considered very heavy for translucent minerals, but is hard to obtain from encrusting specimens. The hardness measure of mineral Linarite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually 2.5. Linarite is commonly found leaving a blue streak when the mineral specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate.

 

            Most crystals of mineral Linarite are usually found transparent to translucent in appearance. The crystal habit of Linarite as described in optical mineralogy usually includes prismatic crystals that are more splendidly exhibited under geological polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Linarite are more rarely found platy to tabular in form. All Linarite crystals tend to have multiple facets that can be noticed more clearly when viewed closely under petrographic polarizing microscopes. The crystals of mineral Linarite are always found tiny to small growing off encrustations on host rocks. Mineral Linarite can be also found as earthy masses. Linarite is usually found forming crusts of small crystals that are splendidly exhibited under polarizing microscopes for geologists. Linarite crystals, even small, are usually found exhibiting intense colors and are most majestically exhibited when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Linarite is usually easily confused with Azurite. However, mineral Linarite usually do not react to dilute hydrochloric acid. The color of Linarite is impressive for the tiny sparkling crystals most especially when viewed under polarized microscopes. The impressing appearance of Linarite crystals can easily convince collectors to have it as other additional collection of wonderful mineral species.

 

            Linarite is commonly found having biaxial negative figure when mineral is evaluated between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing microscopes. The refractive index of Linarite when it is evaluated under geological polarizing light microscope is usually found ranging from 1.809 to 1.859. Linarite also exhibits a very strong surface relief when evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarized microscopes. The maximum birefringence that is commonly exhibited by the mineral when viewed between crossed polars of polarizing microscope is usually 0.050. It also exhibits a strong dispersion when viewed under polarizing microscopes for geologists. Visible pleochroism can be also noticed when the specimen is evaluated between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing light microscope. Pleochroic colors include pale blue to clear blue to Prussian blue. Some Linarite specimens show an alignment of crystals and it is most especially clearly exhibited under petrographic polarizing light microscope. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for mineral Linarite. However, the specimens of this mineral species should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them. Linarite is a non-radioactive mineral species.

 

            Linarite is most commonly found associated with other interesting minerals such as malachite, cerussite, galena, brochantite, and chalcopyrite. Mineral Linarite has been observed to alter to Antlerite and to cerussite with malachite. The best field indicators of mineral Linarite usually include associations, the lack of reaction to acid, crystal habit and color. Mineral Linarite is commonly formed from the oxidation of lead and copper minerals like chalcopyrite and galena. Mineral Linarite notably occurs at several localities including Spain, Leadhills in Scotland, Argentina and some areas in the United States such as Tiger, Arizona and Butte, Montana.



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Thursday, November 27th, 2008 at 3:43 am
Category:
The Sulfates Mineral Class
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