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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of Scapolite is indicated by Na4(Al, Si)12O24Cl to Ca4(Si, Al)12O24(CO3, SO4) or Calcium Sodium Aluminum Silicate Carbonate Chloride Sulfate. Scapolite is actually a Silicate mineral. It is most commonly used as a gemstone mineral that exhibits very fascinating brilliance under gemological microscope. It is also most commonly used as mineral specimen and is often found showing nice and interesting microscope images when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Scapolite is actually a name of a series between mineral marialite and meionite. It is also known to be very similar to other feldspathoid minerals. It is also known to form in metamorphic rocks alteration of plagioclase feldspars. Scapolite comes from the Greek word for shaft that is commonly found in stubby to long prismatic crystals.

 

            A gemstone Scapolite is not really that well known. However, it can be found very attractive producing wonderful brilliance under polarized microscopes for mineralogists. The color of its gemstone is usually nice yellow to orange, pink or violet which can be more splendidly exhibited when viewed with the aid of polarized microscopes. Distinguishing the Scapolite minerals from each other is difficult as they differ only slightly in density and index of refraction, increasing in both with calcium content. Because of this, Scapolite has many shares of pseudonyms. The most common alternate name for Scapolite is Wernerite.           

             Scapolite is most commonly found white, colorless, greenish or gray in color that can be found more interesting when viewed under polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. It is also sometimes found yellow, brown, reddish, pink, violet or blue. Scapolite is also found showing vitreous luster on freshly exposed crystals or surfaces but weathering causes a dulling of the luster when viewed in reflected light of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Most crystals of mineral Scapolite are found translucent to transparent in appearance. It is also known to crystallize in the tetragonal system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this tetragonal system comprises crystals having three axes, which are all in a position perpendicular to one another. Two axes are usually found having the same or equal length.             The crystal habit of mineral Scapolite as described in the field of optical mineralogy usually include prismatic to stocky crystals terminated by a pyramid. This can be observed more clearly with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Complete Scapolite crystals are rare and often have distorted shapes with uneven faces that can be found more clearly visible when specimen samples are closely evaluated with the aid of polarized microscope for mineralogists. Scapolite is also known to have distinct cleavage in several prismatic directions producing a splintery almost fibrous appearance in cleaved massive specimens most especially when they are observed clearly with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Scapolite is most commonly found showing subconchoidal to uneven fracture when viewed under polarizing microscopes in optical mineralogy. The hardness measure of mineral Scapolite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually found ranging from 5.5 to 6. Scapolite is most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of mineral Scapolite is usually found ranging from 2.5 to 2.7 grams per cubic centimeters, which is considered an average value. Scapolite will often fluoresce either orange, yellow or more rarely red under ultraviolet light. The index of refraction of Scapolite varies from 1.54 to 1.60. Scapolite is usually found associated with other interesting minerals including hornblende, garnet minerals, andradite, almandine, microcline, actinolite, apatite, pyroxenes, zircon, diopside, muscovite and many others. The best field indicators of mineral Scapolite usually include cleavage surface features, color, fluorescence, crystal habit and hardness. Scapolite notably occurs at several localities include Burma, Brazil, Switzerland, Norway, Italy, Mexico and some areas in USA.



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Thursday, October 15th, 2009 at 4:11 am
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The Silicates Mineral Class
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