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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

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The chemical formula of mineral Okenite is indicated by CaSi2O4(OH)2 – H2O or Hydrated Calcium Silicate Hydroxide. Okenite is actually a Silicate mineral. It is most commonly used as mineral specimen and is usually found exhibiting splendid images when viewed under polarized light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Okenite is actually an unusual mineral. Most commonly, Okenite is forming cottonball clusters where crystals are so thin and almost look like tiny fibers when viewed under polarized microscopes for mineralogists. The clusters are usually composed of straight, radiating, thread thin, crystals that are more interesting when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. These clusters can actually make for very attractive specimens and often accompany many fine and rare minerals such as apophyllite, gyrolite, and many of the zeolites. Some vesicles can actually be lined with delicate tufts of Okenite and these are sometimes called Okenite Geodes. They are usually found forming crystals that are totally fascinating most especially when viewed with the aid of geological polarizing microscope. It is however important to note that the clusters seem to bring out an urge in people to touch the fine fibers and to test the softness of the mineral. It is also discouraged to touch the crystals because they are so sensitive and very delicate, which when touched will never be the same again.

 

            Okenite is most commonly found white or colorless, which can be fascinating when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. It is also usually found showing resinous to pearly luster when viewed in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscope. Okenite crystals are most commonly found transparent to mostly translucent in appearance. Okenite is also known to crystallize in the triclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this triclinic crystal system commonly comprises crystals having three axes, of which all are unequal in length and are positioned oblique to one another. The crystal habit of mineral Okenite as described in the field of optical mineralogy includes the popular radiating acicular crystals. However, it is more commonly found as radially fibreous masses and rarely as single bladed crystals.

 

            Okenite is can be found having perfect cleavage in one direction but rarely seen because of small crystal size. It is usually found showing splintery fracture when viewed under polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. The hardness measure of the mineral Okenite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is approximately 5. Okenite is most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of the mineral is approximately 2.3+grams per cubic centimeters, which is considered below average. Okenite crystals are also bendable and fragile. The best field indicators of Okenite usually include crystal habit, associations, and color. Okenite is also commonly found associated with other interesting minerals such as gyrolite, calcite, apophyllite, quartz, laumonite, and other zeolites. Okenite also notably occurs at its type of localities including Poona, India and some areas like Ireland, Greenland, and Chile.



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Friday, May 15th, 2009 at 3:22 am
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The Silicates Mineral Class
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