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The chemical formula of mineral Kupletskite is indicated by (K,Na)3(Mn,Fe)7(Ti,Nb)2(SiO3)8(O,OH)7 or Potassium Sodium Manganese Iron Titanium Niobium Silicate Hydroxide. Kupletskite is actually a Silicate mineral. Kupletskite was first described in 1956 at Kola Peninsula in Russia. The mineral was named after Boris Mikhailovich Kupletski (1984-1964) and Elsa Maximilianove Bohnshtedt Kupletskaya (1897-1974), Russian geologists. Mineral Kupletskite is known to crystallize in the triclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this triclinic crystal system commonly comprises crystals having three axes, of which all are unequal in length and are positioned oblique to one another. Kupletskite is most commonly used as mineral specimen and it is often found exhibiting nice and fascinating appearance when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy.

 

Mineral Kupletskite is commonly found forming a solid solution series with astrophyllite and cesium-kupletskite. In optical mineralogy, when two or more minerals share the same structure but may have different chemistry by specific limits, a solid solution series may be formed. In this case, mineral Kupletskite and astrophyllite vary in the amount of manganese and iron in their chemistries. Mineral Kupletskite is actually the manganese rich end member of the series while astrophyllite is the iron rich end member. The structures of the two minerals are the same except for the minor change in chemistry. Mineral Kupletskite is also a member of the Astrophyllite Group of minerals. Mineral Asthrophyllite is actually the namesake of this mineral group. Astrophyllite Group of minerals is comprised of the three minerals Kupletskite, cesium-kupletskite, and astrophyllite. The solid solution series between the Kupletskite and the cesium-kupletskite involves the enrichment of the series with the elements cesium in the potassium or sodium site of the structure.

 

            Mineral Kupletskite is most commonly found exhibiting bronze yellow or dark brown to black color that could be more splendidly exhibited when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Kupletskite is also most commonly found showing vitreous to submetallic to metallic luster when mineral is viewed in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscope for mineralogists. Kupletskite can be also found pearly on cleavage surfaces. The cleavage of mineral Kupletskite is commonly found perfect in one direction and poor in the other direction, all of which can be found more clearly exhibited when specimen is closely evaluated under petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Kupletskite is also usually found exhibiting uneven fracture when it is closely examined with the aid of polarized microscopes for mineralogists. The specific gravity measure of the mineral is usually found ranging from 3.2 grams per cubic centimeters to 3.4 grams per cubic centimeters. The hardness measure of the mineral Kupletskite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually found 3. Kupletskite is most commonly found leaving a pale brown streak when mineral is rubbed on the porcelain streak plate.

 

            Most crystals of mineral Kupletskite are found translucent to opaque in appearance. The crystal habit of mineral Kupletskite as described in optical mineralogy usually includes small tabular, acicular or bladed crystals that are often splendidly exhibited under polarized light microscopes. Mineral Kupletskite can be also found forming lamellar, micaceous or fibrous masses. Kupletskite is commonly found having biaxial negative figure when mineral is evaluated between crossed nicols of geological polarizing light microscopes. The refractive index of the mineral Kupletskite when it is evaluated with the aid of polarized light microscope used in optical mineralogy is usually found ranging from 1.656 to 1.731. Kupletskite is also found exhibiting high surface relief when mineral is closely viewed under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. The maximum birefringence of the mineral when it is evaluated between crossed polars of polarized microscopes for mineralogists is usually 0.075. Kupletskite also exhibits a relatively weak dispersion when viewed under polarized light microscopes for mineralogists. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for mineral Kupletskite. However, the specimens of this mineral species should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them. Mineral Kupletskite is slightly radioactive.

 

            Mineral Kupletskite is commonly found associated with other interesting minerals such as quartz, aegirine, nepheline, microcline, calcite, albite, micas, eudialyte, fluorite, arfvedsonite, and ancylite. The best field indicators of mineral Kupletskite usually include cleavage, localities, brittleness, color and luster. Kupletskite is actually a very rare manganese, titanium mineral that can be found only in some unusual rock assemblages called agpaitic pegmatites. Mineral Kupletskite notably occurs at several localities including the Kola Peninsula in Russia and the Mount Saint Hilaire in Quebec, Canada.



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Monday, February 16th, 2009 at 2:51 am
Category:
The Silicates Mineral Class
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