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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of mineral Kornerupine is indicated by Mg4(Al,Fe)6(Si,Al,B)5O21(OH) or Magnesium Aluminum Iron Boro-silicate Hydroxide. Kornerupine is actually a Silicate mineral. Kornerupine was actually first described in 1884 at Nuuk area of Greenland. The mineral species was named in honor of Andreas Nikolaus Kornerup (1857 – 1883), a Danish geologist. Mineral Kornerupine is known to crystallize in the orthorhombic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this orthorhombic crystal system comprises crystals having three mutually perpendicular axes, of which all are of different lengths.

 

Kornerupine is most commonly used for gemstone purposes and it is often found exhibiting nice and wonderful images when viewed with the aid of gemological microscopes. Kornerupine is also used as mineral specimen and it can be also found exhibiting majestic appearance when viewed under polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Kornerupine is actually a rare gemstone and a rare mineral species that has the capacity to exhibit wonderful images under petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Kornerupine is commonly found showing wonderful emerald green color that is often majestically displayed when the mineral is evaluated under polarized microscope and this is actually its claim to fame.

 

This crystal color of mineral Kornerupine is very much similar to that of the gem emerald. It has also similar but higher index of refraction than emerald when evaluated with the aid of polarized microscope for mineralogists. It even comes with the characteristic inclusions that are also a hallmark of gem emerald. Kornerupine also exhibits pleochroic colors when viewed under polarized microscopes. Pleochroic means different colors can be seen from different viewing angles most especially when examined with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes. When mineral Kornerupine is evaluated under polarizing microscope for geologists, it is commonly found exhibiting colors that change from yellowish green to a brownish red as the crystal or gemstone is being turned with respect to the viewer. Mineral Kornerupine also comes with other attractive colors that are splendidly exhibited under polarized microscopes such as brown, yellow and pinks, other than green. However, Kornerupine can never replace emerald. It can never be considered a threat as a counterfeit because Kornerupine is very rare. In addition, the green colored Kornerupine crystals that are amazingly attractive under polarized microscopes are also very rare. This mineral species Kornerupine is actually most commonly cut for stone collectors only and not for the general public. Mineral Kornerupine is most commonly found in gem gravels. It has enough density to be deposited with other relatively dense minerals such as iolite, ruby, sphene, zircon, topaz, garnets, sapphire, andalusite, chrysoberyl, spinel, diopside and others.

 

            Most crystals of mineral Kornerupine are found transparent to translucent in appearance. The crystal habit of Kornerupine as described in the field of optical mineralogy commonly includes the typical elongated prisms and rounded grains in gem gravels that are usually majestically exhibited under polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Kornerupine is most commonly found showing green, pink, white, brown, yellow, or colorless and it is usually more splendidly exhibited when viewed under petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Kornerupine is also most commonly found exhibiting vitreous luster when specimen is closely examined in reflected light of polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. The specific gravity measure of the mineral Kornerupine is usually found 3.3+ grams per cubic centimeters, which is considered slightly heavier than average. The hardness measure of the mineral Kornerupine when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually ranging from 6 to 7. Kornerupine is most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate.

 

            Kornerupine is most commonly found showing a biaxial negative figure when mineral is evaluated between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Kornerupine also exhibits a high surface relief when viewed under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of the polarizing light microscopes. Kornerupine is most commonly found pleochroic when it is closely evaluated with the aid of polarized microscope for mineralogists. Kornerupine is usually found exhibiting yellowish green to brownish red colors under polarized microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The index of refraction for mineral Kornerupine is usually found ranging from 1.66 to 1.69 when it is evaluated with the aid of polarizing microscopes for geologists. The maximum birefringence found exhibited by mineral Kornerupine between crossed polars of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy is usually 0.014. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for mineral Kornerupine. However, the specimens of this mineral species should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them. Mineral Kornerupine is a non-radioactive mineral species.

 

            Kornerupine is also most commonly found associated with spinel, ruby, quartz, sapphire, orthoclase, zircon, chrysoberyl, and other gemstones that can be found in placer deposits. The best field indicators for mineral Kornerupine usually include color, locality, hardness, and pleochroism. Kornerupine occurs in boron-rich volcanic and sedimentary rocks, which have undergone high-grade metamorphism. It can be also found in metamorphosed anorthite complexes. Mineral Kornerupine is often found in certain gem gravels like the ones located in Sri Lanka. These deposits are actually called placers. Placers form behind the rocks and bends of rivers and are enriched in heavy grains as lighter material is carried further down stream. Mineral Kornerupine is actually a metamorphic mineral before it is being eroded downstream. This Kornerupine notably occurs at several localities including Ratnapura in Sri Lanka, Harts Range in Australia, Betroka in Madagascar, the Nuuk area of Greenland and Kenya.



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Monday, February 16th, 2009 at 2:50 am
Category:
The Silicates Mineral Class
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