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The chemical formula of mineral Clinochlore is indicated by (Mg,Fe, Al)6(Si, Al)4O10(OH)8 or Magnesium Iron Aluminum Silicate Hydroxide. Clinochlore is actually a Silicate mineral. Clinochlore was actually first discovered in the year 1851 at the Brintons Quarry in Chester Co Pennsylvania, USA. The name of the mineral species Clinochlore was derived from the Greek words klinen and chloros, which means inclined and green and also from its system of crystallization. This is actually an allusion to the monoclinic structure of the mineral and its common green color that is usually found splendidly exhibited under polarizing light microscopes. Clinochlore is known to crystallize in the monoclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, the monoclinic system of crystal formation comprises crystals having three axes of unequal lengths. Two of which are usually found in a position that is oblique or not perpendicular to one another. However, both of which are commonly found perpendicular to the third axis.

 

            Mineral Clinochlore is commonly used as mineral specimens. This mineral is also a member of the Clay and Chlorite Group minerals. The Chlorite Group of minerals is a group of phyllosilicate minerals. These minerals are commonly found as an alteration product of mafic minerals in igneous rocks. The name Chlorite was actually derived from a Greek word chloros, which means green. This is actually relative to the common color exhibited by the mineral. Most minerals that belong to this mineral group are found with perfect cleavage, lamellar fracture, and vitreous to pearly or dull luster in reflected light of polarized microscopes. Clinochlore is actually one of the common members of the Chlorite Group. The members of this mineral group are actually difficult to differentiate from each other by ordinary means. And more often, the general name Chlorite is given to mineral specimens that lack distinguishing characteristics. Mineral Clinochlore is commonly found forming a series with the other interesting mineral called chamosite. This mineral Chamosite is known as the iron rich equivalent of the mineral Clinochlore. There is only slight difference that can be found in their properties. Chamosite is commonly found darker and less transparent than mineral Clinochlore. Kaemmererite mineral on the other hand is the chromium rich variety of Clinochlore. This Kaemmererite is usually found beautiful and commonly exhibiting wonderful bright colors of lavender and crimson in transmitted light of petrographic polarizing light microscope.

 

            Clinochlore is most commonly found in shades of green to emerald green color when viewed with the aid of polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Clinochlore can be also found in red, brown, tan, yellow or white that can be very attractive when it is evaluated under polarized light microscope for mineralogists. Clinochlore is also most commonly found exhibiting vitreous to pearly luster when mineral specimen is evaluated in reflected light of polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Clinochlore is also most commonly found showing a basal perfect cleavage in only one direction when mineral specimen is evaluated between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing microscope. Clinochlore also shows uneven fracture when it is examined several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarized light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The specific gravity measure of the mineral clinochlore is commonly found ranging from 2.6 grams per centimeter cube to 3.0 grams per centimeter cube, which considered average. The hardness measure of Clinochlore when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually found ranging from 2 to 2.5. Clinochlore is also most commonly found leaving a greenish white or white streak when the mineral specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate.

 

Clinochlore mineral crystals are commonly found translucent to transparent in appearance. The crystal habit of mineral Clinochlore as described in optical mineralogy commonly includes pseudohexagonal tabular crystals with tapering pyramidal terminations, which are usually exhibiting a nice and splendid microscope image under polarizing microscope for mineralogists. Clinochlore is also commonly found as foliated, fibrous, granular, earthy and massive forms that are majestically exhibited under petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Some larger Clinochlore mineral specimens can be found having twins that can be seen clearly visible when evaluated with the aid of polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists.

 

            Mineral Clinochlore is commonly found showing moderate surface relief when it is evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarizing light microscope. Clinochlore has its cleavage flakes that are commonly found flexible but inelastic. Mineral Clinochlore is commonly found showing biaxial positive figure when it is viewed between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. The refractive index of Clinochlore can be found ranging from 1.572 to 1.599. The maximum birefringence of Clinochlore mineral is usually within a range of 0.005 to 0.011. Mineral Clinochlore is commonly found exhibiting pleochroism in shades of pale green to colorless as well as pale yellow green to pale yellow that can be seen more splendidly exhibited under polarized light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for this mineral Clinochlore. However, the specimens of this mineral should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them. Clinochlore is also a nonradioactive mineral.

 

            Clinochlore mineral is most commonly found associated with several other interesting minerals such as quartz, dolomite, pyrite, fluorapatite, rutile, albite, gmelinite, siderite, calcite, anatase, talc, catapleiite, sphalerite, chlorite, actinolite, serpentine, tainiolite, biotite, chromite, olivine, plagioclase and uvarovite. The best field indicators of mineral Clinochlore usually include color, softness, and cleavage as well as crystal habit. Mineral Clinochlore commonly forms from the metamorphic and hydrothermal alterations of other iron and magnesium silicate minerals. This mineral Clinochlore notably occurs at some famous localities including some areas in the United States like West Chester, Chester County Pennsylvania, Pima and Yavapai Counties, Arizona, Franklin and Sterling Hill, New Jersey, New Idria District in San Benito County, California as well as Zermatt, Velais Switzerland, Tirol, Austria, Shetland, Scotland, Val Malenco, Lombardy and Ala, Piedmont Italy, Kop Daglari, Erzurum in Turkey, the Ural Mountains in Russia and most localities from where Chlorite mineral is found.



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Thursday, January 29th, 2009 at 4:02 am
Category:
The Silicates Mineral Class
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