Leave a message
Fri
15
Jan

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of mineral Bytownite is indicated by CaNa(Al,Si)AlSi2O8 or Calcium Sodium Aluminum Silicate. Bytownite is actually a Silicate mineral. Bytownite derived its name from its famous locality, the Bytown, which is now called Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The name was actually given by T. Thomson in the year 1835. Afterwards, the name Bytownite was applied by G. Tschermak to all those plagioclase feldspars that lie between labradorite and anorthite. And generally, most petrologists have adopted this.

 

            Bytownite minerals are commonly found white, gray in hand samples or sometimes colorless when viewed under petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. But this mineral can be also found in pale shades of other colors. Bytownite minerals commonly exhibit vitreous luster in reflected light of polarizing microscopes for mineralogist, but they may appear dull if weathered. The cleavage found when Bytownite mineral specimen is evaluated under a polarized light microscope in optical mineralogy is actually perfect in one direction and good in another direction that are forming nearly right angled prisms. The fracture that is found exhibited by the mineral is commonly conchoidal when it is examined under a polarized light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. They can be also found having uneven or flat surfaces that are fractured in an uneven pattern. The hardness measure for mineral specimen Bytownite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is commonly found ranging from 6 to 6.5. Bytownite is most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimens are rubbed on the white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of mineral Bytownite commonly gives an approximate value ranging from 2.74 to 2.76 grams per cubic centimters, which is considered as an average value.

 

            Bytownite mineral crystals are known to crystallize in the triclinic of crystal formation. In the field of optical mineralogy, this triclinic crystal system commonly comprises crystals having three axes, of which all are unequal in length and are positioned oblique to one another. Bytownite mineral crystals are commonly found translucent to opaque in appearance and only sometimes found as transparent. They are commonly found translucent in thin edges. The crystal habit of Bytownite mineral as described in the field of optical mineralogy commonly include blocky or tabular crystals, which are clearly visible with the aid of a polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. The tabular crystals are commonly forming dimensions that are shaped like a book. They are rarely found as free crystals but they actually have a nearly rectangular or square cross that are terminated by a slanted dome and pinacoid faces. They are commonly found having twinned crystals as clearly exhibited under a polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Bytownite minerals are also usually found as grains in gabbros and also in compact masses. They can be also found in coarse crystalline dimensions that commonly occur as well-formed coarse sized crystals. Sometimes they are also found in granular forms and they generally occur as anhedral to subhedral crystals in matrix, which are splendidly exhibited under a polarized microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Striated crystals can be also found visible and this are seen as parallel lines in the crystal surfaces or cleavage face when the mineral specimen is evaluated with the aid of a petrographic polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Bytownite minerals are commonly associated with other interesting and splendid minerals such as biotite, pyroxenes and hornblende.

 

            When Bytownite mineral specimens are evaluated between crossed nicols of the petrographic polarizing light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy, they can be actually found having an index of refraction ranging from 1.565 to 1.585. Bytownite can be also found having a lamellar twinning. This may actually cause a grooved effect on the Bytownite crystals and the cleavage surfaces of this mineral, which may appear as striations. Bytownite minerals are also non-fluorescent minerals in either short or long wave ultraviolet light. Bytownite mineral specimen is found to be a biaxial figure under a petrographic polarizing microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Bytownite mineral is both an optically positive and an optically negative figure. Bytownite minerals are also found having a low surface relief when specimens of this mineral are evaluated between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. They also display a strong dispersion in transmitted light of polarized microscopes for mineralogists. After several chemical evaluations, Bytownite is found to be non-radioactive. There is no specific data on the toxicity and health dangers for mineral Bytownite. However, Bytownite mineral specimens should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them. Bytownite minerals are commonly formed in magmatic and metamorphic rocks. They can be also found occurring in basic igneous rocks and in stony meteorites. The best field indicators of mineral Bytownite usually include density, twinning striations, index of refraction and occurrence. Bytownite minerals are actually notably found at some limited localities such as South Africa, Scotland and the Ottawa, Canada that is formerly called as Bytown.



Author:
Time:
Friday, January 15th, 2010 at 4:59 am
Category:
The Silicates Mineral Class
RSS:
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
Navigation:
Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope