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The chemical formula of mineral Babingtonite is indicated by Ca2Fe2Si5O14OH or Calcium Iron Silicate. Babingtonite is actually a Silicate mineral. Mineral Babingtonite was first discovered in the year 1824 at Arendal, Aust-Adger, Norway. This mineral species Babingtonite was named after the William Babington (1757-1833), an Irish physician and mineralogist. Babingtonite is known to be in series with Manganbabingtonite, a variety of babingtonite that contains greater amount of iron over manganese as the second element. Manganbabingtonite is considered as or scientifically classified as a separate species. Babingtonite is considered as the mineral emblem of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Specimens of mineral Babingtonite are usually found in opaque appearance and are usually exhibiting brilliant vitreous luster in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Babingtonite is considered as the only black mineral, which can be found with typically white or pale colored zeolites. This association of Babingtonite with zeolites commonly produce interesting microscope image in reflected light of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. This usually sets it off making it easier to identify small crystals of Babingtonite mineral among other minerals contained in a zeolitic pocket. Babingtonite minerals are considered somewhat rare in occurrence. Its presence in a mineral specimen makes the specimen considerably more valuable. Although Babingtonite is a considerably scarce mineral, it can be found in almost all rare mineral collections.

 

            Babingtonite specimens are almost and always found in shades of black to dark green which is more fascinating when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. It is most commonly found exhibiting a brilliant vitreous luster in reflected light of polarized microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy. Babingtonite is most commonly found showing perfect cleavage found in one direction and good in the other one direction examined under petrographic polarizing microscope for mineralogists. These cleavages are pinacoidal but are near at right angles to each other, which are commonly more clearly exhibited when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy, and are usually found forming rectangular prisms. Babingtonite is also usually found exhibiting subconcoidal fracture when examined under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of a polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Sometimes they can be found showing conchoidal fractures, which are developed in brittle materials characterized by smoothly curving surfaces. The hardness measure Babingtonite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method usually gives a value of 5. The specific gravity measure for mineral specimen Babingtonite usually gives an approximate value of 3.3 grams per cubic centimeters, which is commonly considered somewhat above average for translucent minerals. When Babingtonite mineral specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate, it usually leaves a brown to gray streak.

 

   Babingtonite is known to crystallize in the triclinic system of crystallization. In optical mineralogy, the triclinic crystals commonly exhibit the least symmetry of the crystal system. The triclinic system comprises crystals having three axes, all of which are unequal in length and are commonly found in a position oblique to one another. Most Babingtonite crystals are generally opaque in appearance, but may also appear translucent if found in thin crystals or splinters. The crystal habit of mineral Babingtonite as described in the field of optical mineralogy usually includes short stocky prismatic crystals that can be very interesting when viewed under polarized microscopes and this is considerably a rare crystal formation for mineral Babingtonite. The dominant faces of prismatic crystals are those of a prism, which can be clearly seen exhibited under a geological polarizing light microscope. They may also appear in thick tabular form, which is usually found shaped like a book that is splendidly displayed in reflected light of petrographic polarizing light microscope. Most Babingtonite crystals are commonly found in small flat platy forms and in equant crystals, which are splendidly exhibited under polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Crystals of some Babingtonite minerals can be also found in radial aggregates and sometimes in grains, all of which are fascinatingly interesting to view under a polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Radial forms usually show crystals that are radiating from a center without producing stellar forms. And this habit is usually displaying a majestic appearance when viewed under petrographic polarizing microscopes. Babingtonite minerals commonly occur as striated crystals that are clearly visible when viewed with the aid of polarizing light microscopes for geologists. Crystals of Babingtonite are usually brittle, a property commonly displayed by glasses and most non-metallic minerals. They can be also found in druse forms that are commonly displaying crystal growth in a cavity, which results in numerous crystal tipped surfaces.

 

            Babingtonite minerals are known to be weakly magnetic. They are commonly used as mineral specimens, which are of common interest to rare mineral collectors. Babingtonite mineral is commonly found with biaxial positive figure when evaluated between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. When Babingtonite mineral specimen is evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of petrographic polarizing microscope, it commonly shows high surface relief. It also exhibits relatively strong dispersion when viewed in plane light of polarized microscopes for mineralogists. Babingtonite minerals are found non-radioactive after several chemical tests made. When mineral Babingtonite is evaluated under polarized microscope, it commonly shows no pleochroism. There is no specific data on the toxicity and health dangers for Babingtonite mineral. However, Babingtonite mineral specimens should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them.

 

            Babingtonite minerals are commonly associated with other interesting minerals such as epidote, prehnite, quartz, feldspars, scolecite, apophyllite, other zeolites, stilbite, and heulandites. Mineral Babingtonite mainly occurs in cavities and cracks in granites, gneiss and trap rock, and also in skarns. Babingtonite minerals can be also found with zeolites in altered basalts. They can be also found in veins cutting granite pegmatite and diorite. Also in vugs and cavities in mafic volcanic rocks and gneisses. Babingtonite mineral is a locally abundant accessory mineral, which is usually related to the hydrothermal alteration of the calcic skarns. Best field indicators of mineral Babingtonite commonly include color, crystal habit, luster, and its splendid association with zeolites. Mineral Babingtonite has notable occurrences in types of localities that include Devon, England; Poona, India; Baveno, Italy and several other areas in Massachusetts.



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Tuesday, December 15th, 2009 at 2:43 pm
Category:
The Silicates Mineral Class
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