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The chemical formula of mineral Scorodite is indicated by FeAsO4 – 2H2O or Hydrated Iron Arsenate. Scorodite is actually Phosphate mineral. Scorodite is most commonly used as mineral specimen and it is often found exhibiting nice and interesting microscope images when viewed under petrographic polarizing light microscopes. Scorodite is actually an attractive and colorful mineral that can be more splendidly exhibited when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. Crystals of mineral Scorodite can actually be found forming dipyramids that look like octahedrons. It has been observed that these pseudo-octahedral crystals also resemble the much harder gem mineral zircon. It has been also observed that the color of mineral Scorodite is variable but it is most known and revered for its bright green or blue colors that can be more fascinating and splendidly exhibited when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy.

 Mineral Scorodite is most commonly found colorless, white, green, blue, yellow and brown that could appear more interesting when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Scorodite is also most commonly found exhibiting vitreous to sub-adamantine or greasy luster when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Scorodite crystals are most commonly found transparent to translucent in appearance. Scorodite is known to crystallize in the orthorhombic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this orthorhombic crystal system comprises crystals having three mutually perpendicular axes, of which all are of different lengths. The crystal habits of mineral Scorodite as described in the field of optical mineralogy usually include pseudo-octahedral crystals that are actually orthorhombic dipyramids. Scorodite can be also found tabular and fibrous as well as crusty coatings.  

            Scorodite is most commonly found showing very poor cleavage in a few directions that can be seen more clearly visible when specimen is viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Scorodite is also usually found showing conchoidal fracture when evaluated under polarizing microscope for mineralogists. The hardness measure of the mineral when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually 3.5 to 4. Scorodite is also most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimen sample is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. It is also found to be soluble in hydrochloric acid. The specific gravity measure of the mineral is approximately 3.1 to 3.3 grams per cubic centimeters. Scorodite is most commonly found associated with arsenopyrite, Olivenite, limonite, adamite, arseniosiderite and other oxidation zone minerals. The best field indicators of mineral Scorodite usually include luster, color, crystal habit, non-fluorescent and associations. Mineral Scorodite is usually found forming in the upper oxidation zones of arsenic rich ore bodies. These ore bodies are usually found containing mineral arsenopyrite. Scorodite has been also found as a crust precipitated on the outer rims of hot springs. Scorodite notably occurs at several localities including Mexico, Greece, Brazil, England, Namibia, Ontario and California, USA.

 



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Thursday, July 30th, 2009 at 9:01 am
Category:
The Phosphates Mineral Class
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