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The chemical formula of mineral Berlinite is indicated by the formula AlPO4 or Aluminum Phosphate. This is a rhombic crystal made of sodium phosphate and aluminum salt. Berlinite is actually a Phosphate mineral. Berlinite is considered as a rare phosphate mineral. Berlinite was named in honor of Professor Nils Johan Berlin (1812-1819), a pharmacologist in the University of Lund, Sweden. Berlinite mineral was actually first discovered in the year 1868 at the Vestana Iron Mine, Nastum in Sweden. In Germany, this mineral is called as Berlinit and its Spanish name is actually known as Berlinita. Berlinite minerals are actually considered not outstanding minerals if not because of the fact that they are the only known mineral that are isostructural with quartz. In optical mineralogy, isostructural means the two minerals have the same structure but different chemistries. Berlinite and quartz happen to have the same structure because the aluminum and phosphorus ions found in the chemical structure of Berlinite are of the same size to silicon ions of Quartz. The same structure is actually achieved since the aluminum and phosphorus ions can actually completely replace the silicon ions without alterations the structure of Quartz. Comparison of Quartz and Berlinite mineral crystals are actually fascinating. Each mineral crystal produces a very interesting and fascinating microscope image under a petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy.

 

            Berlinite mineral specimens are commonly found in colorless, gray to pink or rose shades in transmitted light of petrographic polarizing light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. They usually exhibit vitreous luster in reflected light of polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Berlinite mineral is commonly found having absent cleavage even when it is closely evaluated under polarized light microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy. Conchoidal fracture of Berlinite mineral can be found clearly visible when specimen is evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. In the field of optical mineralogy, conchoidal fractures are developed in brittle materials that are commonly characterized by smoothly curving surfaces, which can be seen clearly exhibited when viewed with the aid of polarized microscopes. Fracture describes how a mineral breaks when broken contrary to its natural cleavage planes. The hardness measure of mineral specimen Berlinite using the Mohs scale method is usually found as 6.5. Berlinite specimen is rubbed on the white porcelain streak plate, it is commonly found leaving a white or gray streak. The specific gravity measure of Berlinite specimen usually gives an approximate value of 2.6 grams per cubic centimeters, which is commonly considered average for translucent minerals.

 

            Berlinite mineral specimens are commonly found transparent to translucent in appearance. Mineral Berlinite is known to crystallize in the trigonal division, which can be seen clearly visible with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes. It sometimes crystallizes in the hexagonal system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, hexagonal system of crystallization comprises crystals having four axes. Three of which are positioned in a single plane with equal length and are symmetrically spaced. The fourth axis is found to be perpendicular to the other three axes. Berlinite mineral crystals are usually found in granular masses, which can be seen clearly visible under a geological microscope. It can be also found as disseminated grains, which are usually exhibiting interesting microscope views under a petrographic polarizing light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Crystals of this Berlinite mineral may show a fluorescent dark red color under ultraviolet light.

 

            Mineral specimens of Berlinite are found having sub parallel twinning lamellae, when viewed between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing light microscope. This mineral Berlinite is a biaxial positive figure when evaluated under a polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. It is commonly found exhibiting a low surface relief when viewed under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of the polarizing light microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. There is no specific data on the toxicity and health danger for this mineral Berlinite. However, Berlinite specimens should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them. After several chemical evaluations Berlinite mineral is found not radioactive. Berlinite is considered as a rare mineral in the high-temperature hydrothermal or metasomatic veins. There are also some reported occurrences of Berlinite mineral in vacuoles and along cracks in heavily compacted sediments. Best field indicators of Berlinite mineral commonly include color, hardness, locality and the absence of cleavage. This Berlinite mineral notably occur at the Vestana Iron Mine, Nastum, Sweden. It can be also found at Halsjoberg, Varmland, Sweden.



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Monday, November 30th, 2009 at 4:39 am
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The Phosphates Mineral Class
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