Leave a message
Tue
15
Dec

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of mineral Bayldonite is indicated by Cu3Pb(AsO4)2-H2O or Hydrated Copper Lead Arsenate Hydroxide. Bayldonite is actually a Phosphate mineral. Bayldonite is considered as another attractive arsenate mineral. Mineral species Bayldonite was first discovered by John Bayldon in a mining area found at Cornwall, England. In the year 1865, Bayldonite was first classified as a mineral. The Bayldonite chemical formula however was only discovered in the year 1956. Bayldonite was named after John Bayldon, a British physician. It is commonly found in its nice green color with high resinous luster, which can be splendidly exhibited when the mineral is viewed in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. The green color of Bayldonite mineral is caused by the copper content, which is found in its chemical composition. Its high luster on the other hand is due to its lead content. Some Bayldonite specimens are found containing some amount of zinc in its chemical composition.

 

            Bayldonite mineral specimens are usually found in shades of green to yellow green or yellow in both transmitted and reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Specimen of Bayldonite mineral usually exhibits resinous luster in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Bayldonite mineral is commonly found with absent cleavage when it is evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. Bayldonite specimen usually shows uneven fracture when it is examined under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarizing microscope for optical mineralogy. Uneven flat surfaces that are commonly fractured in an uneven pattern and these are clearly exhibited when viewed under polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. In optical mineralogy field of study, fracture describes how a mineral breaks when broken contrary to its natural cleavage planes and this can be seen when the crystal examination is made under several stage rotation or aperture diaphragm adjustments on polarized microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The hardness measure for mineral Bayldonite using the Mohs scale method is usually 4.5. When mineral specimens of Bayldonite are rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate, it usually leaves a green streak. The specific gravity measure for mineral specimen Bayldonite commonly gives an approximate value of 5.5 grams per cubic centimeters, which is usually considered well above average value for translucent minerals.

 

            Bayldonite minerals are known to crystallize in the monoclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, the monoclinic system of crystal formation comprises crystals having three axes of unequal lengths. Two of which are usually found in a position that is oblique or not perpendicular to one another. However, both of which are commonly found perpendicular to the third axis. Bayldonite mineral crystals are commonly found in transparent to translucent in appearance. The crystal habits of Bayldonite as described in the field of optical mineralogy commonly include tabular crystals, which are usually found shaped like a book, which can be very splendid when viewed with the aid of polarizing light microscopes. They can be also found in radiating fibrous crystals, sometimes in granular and massive crusts. Fibrous crystals show individual grains that are long slender fibers, which commonly shows interesting microscope images under a petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Radiating crystals usually show elongate grains that radiate out from a center, a splendid view under polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Bayldonite minerals can be also found as botryoidal crystal clusters, which are clearly identified with the aid of polarized light microscopes in optical mineralogy. Some Bayldonite mineral specimens are found powdery to fine granular in form. They can be also found as minute mammillary concretions. Mammilliary formation is a larger breast like rounded forms that resembles botryoidal. Sometimes, Bayldonite minerals are found in druse form, which commonly show crystal growth in a cavity that results in numerous crystal tipped surfaces that are splendidly exhibited in transmitted light of petrographic polarizing microscopes. They can be also found as encrustations, which usually forms crust like aggregates on matrix.

 

            Bayldonite mineral specimens are commonly found displaying a biaxial positive figure when viewed between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in the field of optical mineralogy. Bayldonite also exhibits very high surface relief and this can be found when the mineral is evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of polarized microscope used in optical mineralogy. It shows relatively weak dispersion in plane light of geological polarizing microscope for mineralogists. There is no specific data on toxicity and health dangers for mineral Bayldonite. However, Bayldonite specimens should be treated with great care and use of sensible precautions are advised upon handling them. Bayldonite minerals are found not radioactive after several chemical tests made.

 

            Bayldonite minerals are commonly associated with other interesting minerals such as limonite, duftite, quartz, mimetite, cerussite, bindheimite, azurite and wulfenite. There are some specimens found with dark green crystals of Bayldonite lining the cavities of a white quartz matrix. Bayldonite minerals are considered as secondary minerals, which are formed in the oxidation zones of copper ore-bearing veins. This Bayldonite mineral is usually found as green or yellow colored encrustation on the surface of other rocks and minerals. Best field indicators of mineral Bayldonite commonly include color, streak, density, crystal habit, locality, lack of cleavage and its splendid association with other interesting minerals. Bayldonite minerals are commonly formed in the oxidation zone of ore deposits. Nice Bayldonite mineral specimens are found at Penberthy Croft Mine, St. Hilary in Cornwall, England. These Bayldonite minerals can be also used to make attractive cabochons. Bayldonite mineral specimens can be only found in a few localities. They are considerably scarce minerals and any specimen is undeniably treasured when found. Bayldonite minerals can be also found in localities like the Wheal Carpenter Mine, St. Day, Cornwall, England; Tsumeb, Namibia and Arizona in the United States.



Author:
Time:
Tuesday, December 15th, 2009 at 2:46 pm
Category:
The Phosphates Mineral Class
RSS:
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
Navigation:
Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope