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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

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The chemical formula of mineral Uraninite is indicated by UO2 or Uranium Oxide. Uraninite actually belongs to the Oxides and Hydroxides mineral class. Uraninite is also considered as a major ore of uranium and radium. It is also a source of helium and it is also used as mineral specimen and is often found showing nice and interesting microscope images when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Uraninite is a highly radioactive but interesting mineral. Uraninite is a chief ore of uranium and radium, which can only be found in trace amounts. It has been known that helium was first discovered on the earth samples of Uraninite. Radium and helium are found in Uraninite because they are the principle products in the process of the decayed uranium.

             The structure of the mineral Uraninite is analogous to that of Fluorite. There is one variety of Uraninite called pitchblende which is a combination of mostly Uraninite and some other minerals. It is actually generally softer and less dense and usually botryoidal or earthy. Uraninite is a highly radioactive mineral and should be stored away from other minerals that are easily affected by radioactivity and human exposure should be limited. Uraninite is usually found black to steel black with tints of brown that can be found more interesting when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Uraninite is usually found showing submetallic to pitchy and dull luster when viewed in reflected light of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Most crystals of mineral Uraninite are found opaque in appearance. Uraninite is known to crystallize in the isometric system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this isometric crystal system comprises crystals having three axes, all of which are perpendicular to one another and all are found equal in lengths.             The crystal habit of mineral Uraninite typically includes massive botryoidal, earthy, lamellar and reniform aggregates as described in the field of optical mineralogy. Well-formed individual cubic and octahedral crystals are rare. Uraninite is most commonly found showing concoidal fracture when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. The hardness measure of the mineral Uraninite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually ranging from 5 to 6. Uraninite is most commonly found leaving a brownish black color when specimen sample is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of mineral Uraninite is near 10 grams per cubic centimeters when pure but often massive specimens have closer to 7 grams per cubic centimeters, which is heavy even for metallic minerals. Uraninite is most commonly associated with other interesting minerals including pyrite, native silver, cassiterite, autunite, uranocircite, torbernite and other uranium minerals. It is important to note that Uraninite is highly radioactive. The best field indicators of mineral Uraninite usually include luster, streak, color and radioactivity. Uraninite notably occurs at several localities including Germany, France, England, Zaire, Canada, Portugal, France and some areas in USA.



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Sunday, August 30th, 2009 at 4:06 am
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The Oxides and Hydroxides Mineral Class
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