Leave a message
Thu
29
Jan

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of mineral Columbite is indicated by (Fe, Mn, Mg)(Nb,Ta)2O6 or Iron Manganese Magnesium Niobium Tantalum Oxide. Columbite actually belongs to the Oxides and Hydroxides mineral class. Long before, Niobium has been called Columbium that was named after Columbia or America by Charles Hatchett in the year 1801. And this is where the name Columbite was derived. Niobium became the official name after a century debate in 1950s. But despite this change, some groups still do not recognize the official name Niobium and still back to referring to it as Columbite. And actually, most geologists are still referring to its mineral namesake Columbite rather than the proposed niobite. Columbite is known to crystallize in the orthorhombic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this orthorhombic crystal system comprises crystals having three mutually perpendicular axes, of which all are of different lengths.

 

Columbite is commonly used as a mineral specimen and it usually exhibits interesting microscope appearance when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Columbite is also considered as an ore of niobium and tantalum and it is most commonly found exhibiting fascinating images when evaluated as an ore mineral under an ore polarizing light microscope for mineralogists. Columbite is considered the most widespread niobium mineral. Mineral Columbite makes for an important metal called niobium. Niobium is actually considered the most industrially useful metal. It is commonly used in alloys for strength improvement. Niobium is also found showing super conductive properties. And it has been being studied with other metals for possible alloy breakthrough the field of new industry.

 

            Mineral Columbite is commonly found exhibiting dark black color and sometimes iron black to dark brown when it is closely evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Columbite is most commonly found exhibiting submetallic luster when it is viewed in reflected light of polarized microscope for mineralogists. Columbite is most commonly found showing good cleavage in one direction when it is closely evaluated with the aid of polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Columbite also shows subconchoidal fracture and it could be seen more clearly visible when it is evaluated under several adjustments on the aperture diaphragm of the petrographic polarizing microscope for mineralogists. The hardness measure of mineral Columbite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually found 6. Columbite is most commonly found leaving a brown to black streak when mineral specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of mineral Columbite usually gives an approximate value ranging from 5.0 grams per cubic centimeters to 5.3 grams per cubic centimeters if found as near pure Columbite mineral. This density possessed by Columbite is considered very heavy for nonmetallic minerals. The specific gravity of mineral Columbite actually varies. It increases up to 7.3 grams per cubic centimeters with the increasing amount of tantalum.

 

            Most Columbite mineral crystals are found nearly opaque in appearance and they can even appear transparent in thin splinters when viewed under petrographic polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. The crystal habit of mineral Columbite as described in optical mineralogy commonly includes stubby prismatic crystals with terminations that are complexly faceted and sometimes rounded, which can be clearly visible under petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Mineral Columbite can be also found as very flat tabular crystals that are often aggregated together in parallel or sometimes in nearly parallel groups, which can seen clearly seen exhibited under polarized light microscopes. They can be also found in massive or granular form.

 

            Some specimen of Columbite may demonstrate weak magnetism. Twinned crystals of mineral Columbite are common and they can be seen more clearly visible when closely evaluated with the aid of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The twin planes of this mineral can be seen clearly visible under polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. The twins that can be found are usually contact twins, heart shaped and sometimes exhibits a delicate featherlike striations, all of which are usually very interesting when evaluated under polarized microscope used in optical mineralogy. Penetration twins can be also possibly found when viewed with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscope. Repeated twins usually yield pseudohexagonal trillings, which can be splendidly exhibited under polarizing light microscope. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for mineral Columbite. However, the specimens of this mineral should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handling them.

 

            Columbite is most commonly found associated with several other interesting minerals such as albite, cassiterite, amblygonite, spodumene, microcline, beryl, lepidolite, apatite, tourmalines and microlite. The best field indicators of mineral Columbite usually include streak, specific gravity, crystal habit and fascinating association with other interesting minerals. Mineral Columbite is commonly found as an accessory mineral in granitic pegmatites. In placer deposits in streams it usually occurs as a heavy mineral. Mineral Columbite notably occurs at some famous mineral localities including some areas in the United States like Colorado and Amelia, Virginia, Newry, Maine and San Diego Co., California. Columbite can be also found in Kugi Lyal. Pamir, Russia, Norway, Finland, Brazil, Renfrow County, Ontario, Canada, Argentina, Sweden and Madagascar.



Author:
Time:
Thursday, January 29th, 2009 at 4:04 am
Category:
The Oxides and Hydroxides Mineral Class
RSS:
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
Navigation:
Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope