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Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

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The chemical formula of Native Silver is indicated by the chemical symbol Ag. It is actually classified as an Element and belongs to the Native Elements mineral class. Silver is considered as a minor ore of silver for jewelry purposes, coins and photographic films and other industrial uses. Silver is actually mined for eons and has always been popular in jewelry and for coinage. The great demand for silver is for it use for photography industry, which takes advantage of the reactivity to light property of silver. Native Silver is actually so rare. There can be more silver that can be produce from the silver-bearing minerals such as prousite, galena, Pyrargyrite and many more. When specimens of Native Silver are evaluated under polarized microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy, it is usually found consisting of wires that are curved and intertwined together making an inspiring mineralogical curiosity.

             Native Silver is most commonly found silver white and it is usually found tarnishing into black color when exposed. Native Silver is usually found exhibiting nice and interesting microscope images when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscope for mineralogists. Native Silver is most commonly found showing metallic luster when viewed in reflected light of polarizing microscope used in petrographic polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Native Silver specimens are usually found opaque in appearance. Native Silver crystals are known to crystallize in the isometric crystal system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, this isometric crystal system comprises crystals having three axes, all of which are perpendicular to one another and all are found equal in lengths.             The crystal habit of Native Silver usually include massive and disseminated grains, wires and plates as the most common and usually much more interesting when viewed with the aid of  petrographic polarizing light microscope used in optical mineralogy. Whole individual crystals are extremely rare but when found present are usually in cube form, dodecahedrons and octahedrons. Jack Frost type of crystal growth that can be seen in some Native Silver specimens are usually found producing beautiful and fascinating intricate structures when viewed with the aid of polarized microscopes for mineralogists. Native Silver can be also found forming wires          appearing as coiled clusters that resemble rams horns. Native Silver has absent cleavage even when it is viewed closely under petrographic polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. It also shows jagged fracture when closely evaluated with the aid of polarizing microscopes for mineralogists. Native Silver is also most commonly found leaving a silver white streak when specimen is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate. The specific gravity measure of the Native Silver mineral is variable and this is actually according to purity, from 10 to 12 grams per cubic centimeters, which is well above average even for metallic minerals. The Native Silver mineral is ductile, malleable and sectile. In the field of optical mineralogy, this means it can be pounded into other shapes, stretched into a wire and cut into a slices. The best field indicators of Native Silver usually include color, tarnish, crystal habit and ductility. Native Silver is usually found associated with other silver minerals such as prousite, acanthite, copper, cobaltite, quartz and zeolites. Native Silver notably occurs at several areas including Michigan and Arizona, USA. It can be also found in Ontario, Chile and Germany.



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Thursday, August 13th, 2009 at 2:06 pm
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The Native Elements Mineral Class
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