Leave a message
Mon
16
Feb

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope

The chemical formula of mineral Kernite is indicated by Na2B4O6(OH)2 – 3H2O or Hydrated Sodium Borate Hydroxide. Kernite is actually a Carbonate mineral. Kernite is also a member of the Borates Group of minerals. Kernite was named after its type of locality at Kern County, California, USA. It was first discovered from this locality in 1927. Kernite is known to crystallize in the monoclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, the monoclinic system of crystal formation comprises crystals having three axes of unequal lengths. Two of which are usually found in a position that is oblique or not perpendicular to one another. However, both of which are commonly found perpendicular to the third axis.

 

Mineral Kernite is a structurally complex mineral. Its basic structure contains chains of interlocking BO3(OH) tetrahedrons. The basic unit of the chain has a formula indicated by B4O6(OH)2 and with negative two charge. The triangular BO3 groups with sodiums are connected to the chains. The water molecules on the other hand are found interspersed between the chains. Individual crystals of mineral Kernite can be quite transparent and may also appear similar to certain gypsum crystals. The only difference is that Kernite crystals are usually found harder and commonly have splintery cleavage fragments that can be made visible when evaluated with the aid of petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Kernite mineral specimens are usually found exhibiting interesting microscope images under polarized light microscope for mineralogists. It can be considered as one good addition to one’s mineral collections.

 

            Kernite is considered as an ore of boron. And as an ore mineral, Kernite is usually found exhibiting nice and interesting microscope appearance when evaluated under an ore polarizing light microscope. Kernite is also commonly used as mineral specimen and it is most often found exhibiting wonderful appearance under petrographic polarizing light microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Most crystals of mineral Kernite are found translucent to transparent in appearance. The crystal habit of mineral Kernite as described in the field of optical mineralogy usually includes short prismatic crystals that are more fascinatingly exhibited under polarized light microscopes for mineralogists. Kernite crystals however are more commonly found in parallel aggregates resembling vein mineral.

 

Mineral Kernite is commonly found white or gray to colorless appearance that can be interesting seen more interesting when viewed with the aid of polarizing microscope used in optical mineralogy. Kernite is most commonly found exhibiting vitreous to greasy luster when viewed in reflected light of polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. Mineral Kernite is commonly found showing perfect cleavage in two directions forming splintery fragments that are more clearly visible when viewed under polarized light microscope for mineralogists. Kernite is also most often found showing splintery fracture due to cleavage and this can be seen more clearly visible when mineral is viewed with the aid of polarizing microscope for mineralogists. The specific gravity measure of the mineral usually gives an approximate value of about 1.9+grams per cubic centimeters, which is a very low density. The hardness measure of mineral Kernite when it is evaluated using the Mohs scale method is usually found ranging from 2.5 to 3, which is considered harder than a fingernail. Kernite is most commonly found leaving a white streak when specimen of is rubbed on a white porcelain streak plate.

 

            Mineral Kernite is most commonly found showing biaxial negative figure when it is closely viewed between crossed polars of petrographic polarizing microscopes used in optical mineralogy. The refractive index of mineral Kernite is usually found ranging from 1.454 to 1.488 and this is much clearly exhibited under polarizing microscope for mineralogists. The maximum birefringence of mineral Kernite when it is evaluated between crossed nicols of polarized light microscope is usually 0.034. Kernite also exhibits a moderate surface relief when specimen viewed under polarized microscope used in optical mineralogy. Kernite has distinct dispersion found when viewed under polarizing light microscopes for mineralogists. Kernite is highly soluble in water. There is no specific data found on the toxicity and health dangers for mineral Kernite. However, the specimen of this mineral species should be treated with great care and use of sensible precaution is advised upon handing them. Mineral Kernite is a non-radioactive mineral species.

 

            Mineral Kernite is most commonly found associated with other interesting minerals including borax, hydroboracite, ulexite, and other borate minerals. The best field indicators of mineral Kernite usually include hardness, crystal habit, density, associations, splintery cleavage, and locality. Mineral Kernite could be considered as metamorphic mineral. This is so because it is thought to form from the recrystallization of borax due to mild pressure and heat. Mineral borax is usually directly deposited in arid regions from the evaporation of water in the intermittent lakes called playas. These playas form only during rainy days due to the runoff from adjacent mountains. These runoffs are usually found rich in element boron and are highly concentrated by evaporation in the arid climate. Due to this great concentration, crystals of borax and other boron minerals form and eventually accumulate to great thickness. Mineral Kernite is commonly found at the bottom of this deposit. Kernite is usually found in stratified units with some Kernite crystals layers that grow several feet thick. Mineral Kernite occurs in sedimentary evaporite deposits in arid regions. Mineral Kernite notably occurs at several localities such as Turkey, Chile, and also in Kern Co., California, USA.



Author:
Time:
Monday, February 16th, 2009 at 2:47 am
Category:
The Carbonates and Borates Mineral Class
RSS:
You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed.
Navigation:
Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope