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The chemical formula of mineral Jensenite is indicated by Cu3TeO6•2(H2O). Jensenite is considered as a secondary alteration of Cu and Te ore minerals. Mineral Jensenite is commonly found at its type of locality at the dumps of the Centennial Eureka mine, Tintic district, Juab County, Utah, USA. Jensenite was named for Mr. Matin C. Jensen (1959-), who first collected and recognized this mineral as a potentially new species. Jensenite is known to crystallize in the monoclinic system of crystal formation. In optical mineralogy, the monoclinic system of crystal formation comprises crystals having three axes of unequal lengths. Two of which are usually found in a position that is oblique or not perpendicular to one another. However, both of which are commonly found perpendicular to the third axis. Jensenite is commonly found showing fair cleavage in one direction when viewed with the aid of polarized microscope for mineralogists. It is also found having emerald green color in hand sample. The density measure of mineral Jensenite is usually found 4.76 grams per cubic centimeters. Most crystals of mineral Jensenite are found transparent in appearance. Mineral Jensenite is commonly found showing brittle to uneven fracture with very brittle fracture producing uneven fragments. The crystal habit of mineral Jensenite as described in the field of optical mineralogy usually includes cryptocrystalline forms occurring as crystals too small to distinguish with the naked eye. It can be also found pseudo rhombohedral in form with crystals showing a rhombohedral outline. Jensenite is known to have subhedral crystals occurring as crystals which tend to exhibit a recognizable crystal shape. The hardness measure of mineral Jensenite is commonly found ranging from 3 to 4 when evaluated using the Mohs scale method. This mineral is found to have non-fluorescent crystals. Adamantine luster. Jensenite is also found leaving an emerald green streak when rubbed on white porcelain streak plate. Mineral Jensenite is also found to have biaxial figure when viewed between crossed nicols of petrographic polarizing microscope used in the field of optical mineralogy. Jensenite has weak bireflectance found also if evaluated under polarized microscopes. Mineral Jensenite is commonly found with gray interference color with bright green internal reflections at grain boundaries. Jensenite is found to be not radioactive.



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Friday, September 30th, 2011 at 3:04 am
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Optical Mineralogy
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