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Archive for January, 2009

Cuprosklodowskite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Cuprosklodowskite is indicated by Cu(UO2)2Si2O7 – 6H2O or Hydrated Copper Uranyl Silicate. Cuprosklodowskite is actually a Silicate mineral. The name Cuprosklodowskite was actually supplied by Buttgenbach while introducing Vaes paper, in the mistaken belief that it was the copper analog of sklodowskite. The name actually originated from the word copper […]

Cuprite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Cuprite is indicated by Cu2O or Copper Oxide. Cuprite actually belongs to the Oxides and Hydroxides mineral class. Cuprite was first described in the year 1845. The name of the mineral species Cuprite is derived from the Latin word cuprum, which means copper. This is an allusion to its copper […]

Cummingtonite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Cummingtonite is indicated by (Mg, Fe)7Si8O22(OH)2 or Magnesium Iron Silicate Hydroxide. Cummingtonite is actually a Silicate mineral. The name Cummingtonite was derived from the name of its type of locality in Cummington, Massachusetts in the United States. The first mineral specimen of Cummingtonite was actually found in this type of […]

Cumengite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Cumengite is indicated by the formula Pb21Cu20Cl42(OH)40 or Lead Copper Chloride Hydroxide. Cumengite is actually a Halide mineral. Cumengite is actually considered as the most desirable piece of halide mineral collection due to its extremely interesting crystal habit, rarity, unusual chemistry and fascinatingly beautiful color under polarizing light microscope. Sometimes […]

Cristobalite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Cristobalite is indicated by SiO2 or Silicon Dioxide. Cristobalite is actually a Silicate mineral. The name Cristobalite was derived from the name of one of its types of locality in Cerro San Cristobal, Mexico. This mineral was actually first described and first discovered in the year 1887 at Hidalgo in […]

Covellite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of the mineral Covellite is indicated by CuS or Copper Sulfide. Covellite is actually a Sulfide mineral. Covellite was first discovered in the year 1832 at the Mount Vesuvius in Campania, Italy. It was actually first discovered and first described by Niccola Covelli, an Italian mineralogist. Thus, the mineral was named Covellite […]

Columbite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Columbite is indicated by (Fe, Mn, Mg)(Nb,Ta)2O6 or Iron Manganese Magnesium Niobium Tantalum Oxide. Columbite actually belongs to the Oxides and Hydroxides mineral class. Long before, Niobium has been called Columbium that was named after Columbia or America by Charles Hatchett in the year 1801. And this is where the […]

Coconinoite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Coconinoite is indicated by Fe2Al2(UO2)2(PO4)4(SO4)(OH)2 – 20H2O or Hydrated Iron Aluminum Uranyl Phosphate Sulfate Hydroxide. Coconinoite is actually a Phosphate mineral. The name Coconinoite was actually derived from the name of the locality where it was first discovered. Coconinoite mineral was first found and first described in the year 1966 […]

Clinochlore

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Clinochlore is indicated by (Mg,Fe, Al)6(Si, Al)4O10(OH)8 or Magnesium Iron Aluminum Silicate Hydroxide. Clinochlore is actually a Silicate mineral. Clinochlore was actually first discovered in the year 1851 at the Brintons Quarry in Chester Co Pennsylvania, USA. The name of the mineral species Clinochlore was derived from the Greek words […]

Cleavelandite

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

The chemical formula of mineral Cleavelandite is indicated by NaAlSi3O8 or Sodium Aluminum Silicate. Cleavelandite is a platy variety of mineral Albite Cleavelandite is actually a Silicate mineral. Mineral Cleavelandite was actually named after Parker Cleaveland, a geology and mineralogy professor at the Bowdoin College in Maine in the United States during the early 1800s. […]

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