Leave a message

Archive for April, 2008

Forms of Minerals

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        Crystals are said to be bounded by planes. This is so because crystals are usually formed when the conditions were favorable for complete development. The said crystals are referred to us idiomorphic or automorphic. Phenocrysts are the crystals that are considerably large in comparison with other accompanying crystals as found when the specimen […]

Brucite

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        The chemical formula of mineral Brucite is Mg(OH)2 or Magnesium Hydroxide. Brucite is a Hydroxides mineral, which has hexagonal or trigonal crystal system. The hexagonal system of crystallization comprises crystals having four axes. Three of which are positioned in a single plane with equal length and are symmetrically spaced. The fourth axis is […]

Anhydrite

Monday, April 14th, 2008

The chemical formula of Anhydrite is CaSO4 or Calcium Sulfate. Anhydrite is a Sulfate mineral, which is considered extremely rare. It is actually a relatively common sedimentary mineral that usually forms in massive rock layers. This sulfate mineral Anhydrite is an important rock-forming mineral whose occurrence is associated to Gypsum, Limestone, Dolomite, and Salt beds. […]

Transparent Minerals

Monday, April 14th, 2008

The identification of transparent minerals can be done with the use of the transmitted light. The petrographic polarizing microscopes used for this observations in optical mineralogy is supposed to be conditioned with both nicols swung out of the field and a strong beam of light should be coming up through the transparent section from the […]

Optical Distinction Between Crystal Sections

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        In optical mineralogy, the interference figures are always in symmetrical shape and distribution of color to the planes and axes of symmetry of the crystal system. Therefore, it can be note that it is most symmetrical in the orthorhombic, less symmetrical in the monoclinic, and also less symmetrical in the triclinic system.

Magnetite

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        The chemical formula of Magnetite is indicated by Fe3O4 or Iron Oxide. Magnetite is an Oxide mineral. It is also a member of the Spinel Group of minerals. Magnetite is most commonly found opaque when viewed under polarizing microscopes. Magnetite is considered as a major ore of iron and it is often found […]

Limonite

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        The chemical formula of Limonite is a mixture of hydrated iron oxide-hydroxide of varying composition. Its generic formula however is frequently written as FeO(OH) – nH20. Although this formula is actually not entirely correct, it often contains a varying amount of oxide compared to hydroxide. Limonite is a Hydroxide mineral. Limonite is an […]

Interference Colors

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        In optical mineralogy, the interference colors shown by any mineral section is dependent on three factors such as the strength of the double refraction, the position of the section in the crystal, and the thickness of the crystal section. Care must always be taken into consideration in order to obtain the maximum interference […]

Ilmenite

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        The chemical formula of Ilmenite is indicated by FeTiO3 or Iron Titanium Oxide. Ilmenite is an Oxide mineral. It is also a member of the Hematite Group of minerals. Ilmenite is also considered as a major ore of Titanium. Also, it is a minor ore of iron. Ilmenite is an opaque mineral and […]

Halite

Monday, April 14th, 2008

        The chemical formula of Halite is indicated by NaCl or Sodium Chloride. Halite is a Halides mineral. It is known to crystallize in the isometric system. In optical mineralogy, this isometric system comprises crystals having three axes, all of which are perpendicular to one another and all are found equal in lengths.  Halite […]

Click Here For Best Selection Of High Quality Polarizing Microscope